Hey, kids. Are you fed up with today’s politics? Are you tired of all the riff-raff and chit-chat
and knick knacks and tic tacs of current politics? Don’t get me wrong, our governments today
are way better than the governments of times when one guy was in charge because God said
so, or something, but our governments still aren’t exactly the best they can be. From constant scandals to disagreements turning
into shouting matches, it can be hard to get much of anything passed in government. A large part of that is probably because even
the most perfect governments are still led by a bunch of smelly, biased apes, so what
if we did something else? What if we replaced our human politicians
with robot politicians? Now, this wouldn’t be the robotic apocalypse
we’ve all been fearing, just a rearrangement of our governments so they can be run more
efficiently. After all, humans may have completely maxed
out their intelligence stat, but their play type still revolves very strongly around team
bias, with many frequently being criticized for not knowing the true inner workings of
the game, or their respective civ. This often results in things like populism,
and prioritizing personality over actual policies when voting for new leaders, allowing some
certain players to simply game the system, almost as if they were playing some sort of
video game. Bot-run governments could also run a lot more
efficiently than human admins. Bots have a lot of advantages to other players,
as they can remain on the server pretty much indefinitely, and could also respond to an
issue much quicker, and possibly much more logically than human admins, in addition to
being able to process requests from millions of players at a time. They could also hold huge amounts of in-game
data, replacing the need for looking through guild archives and being able to draw on historical
outcomes of similar issues to see how their intended actions might turn out, instead of
just using educated guesses and lobbying. Although, if they were to play in the most
logical way possible, it’s doubtful they would have the best bedside manner to most. AI is of course short for artificial intelligence,
as in decisions made by a brain we created with tools, and silicon, and stuff. Artificial intelligence is defined as “the
theory and development of computer systems able to perform tasks that normally require
human intelligence, such as visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, and translation
between languages”. Now, government is also defined as “the
governing body of a nation, state, or community”. The word “government” stems from the word
“govern”, which came from the French “governer”, which itself came from the Latin “gubernare”
meaning ‘to rule’ or ‘to steer’, which came from the Greek “kubernao (κυβερνάω)”,
meaning ‘to steer’. So what history’s essentially saying is
that government is basically the people in charge of driving the country. What a strange coincidence! But running the government doesn’t just
mean making new laws and signing new treaties with other countries, it also involves filing
paperwork. A lot of paperwork. After all, the government is also what’s
in charge of issuing your passport, your birth certificate, managing your health care access,
and giving out licenses and permits. We might not yet be able to use machine learning
algorithms to turn our politicians and lawmakers into computers, but would it make sense to
automate government bureaucracy instead? Well, computers can be used to do everything
from prescribing medications to processing legal information in trials. Like running the government, tasks like these
also require a huge amount of paperwork that would be a lot for a human to achieve on their
own. A lot of it just involves sifting through
records and paperwork, which a human can do just fine, but it would take a while. I mean, If you wanted to find a specific word
among a huge wall of text. It would be so much easier to do by just pressing
command+F and letting the computer do the work for you. In fact, sometime in the middle of this century,
a computer could have the processing power to model every human brain on Earth, which
means machines definitely could take over government positions, but we don’t have
to go from 100% human politicians to 100% computer politicians overnight. So maybe we don’t have to give our power
and authority over to computers, at least not yet. There are still some problems with that, though. For one, the US federal government alone hires
2 million people, which isn’t even including those who work for organizations like USPS
and the military. This could lead to some outrage from federal
employees worried about losing said jobs, I mean we all saw what happened when the government
recently shut down. However, whenever the workers try to protest
against technology being implemented to replace them for less, the onward march of technology
usually wins. For example, in the 19th century, many English
textile workers (known as “luddites”) banded together to smash the machines that
were coming to replace them in the factories. Were they successful? Maybe, if their goal was to get arrested and
shipped off to Australia, that is. The point is, people don’t like it when
machines (or anyone, for that matter) come to take their jobs. So, the real question with implementing automated
politicians is not if the computers can do the work of politicians, but if our current
politicians will let them, and if history can tell us something else here, the answer
is no, but will they always have that choice? One thing that’s important to remember is
that robot politicians and lawmakers will need a lot of data on past events and how
they affected their societies, and even if their effect was a good or a bad thing. Take Brexit as an example, 52% of voters voted
for the UK to leave the EU and 48% voted to stay, so it’s clear that there is no immediate
consensus on what should have been done. Would an automated government have chosen
to stay or to leave, and would they have done so out of what they considered Britain’s
best interests, or what the people said they all wanted at the time? What even are Britain’s best interests? Matter of fact, the whole Brexit referendum
was just a campaign promise David Cameron made to try to stay in power, so would it
even have happened in the first place? This whole argument is kind of circular in
nature, but hopefully whenever someone asks you if robots will one day take over the government,
and if that would even be a good or a bad thing, hopefully now you know better. Okay, back to who I normally am. So, you might have noticed that this isn’t
really a normal video of mine, and that’s because, well… it is the April Fool’s
Day special, after all. Nevertheless, this is something I’ve been
wanting to do for a long time now, so I am very excited to finally be able to make it. Now, I am a big fan of the six channels I
just parodied, and a few of them are also very close friends of mine, so definitely
be sure to subscribe to their channels if you like their format, and better accents. Links are provided down below. If you enjoyed this video and want to see
more from this particular channel, do be sure to like, share and subscribe for more 3-6
minute long, semi-animated videos about different aspects about the world, posted every Sunday. Just, in a slightly different style.